2018 Beyond the morass: A national strategy for chronic pain in Canada
Co-chaired by CAHS Fellows Drs. Yves De Koninck and Patrick McGrath, our 2018 Forum didn’t disappoint.  Beyond the morass: A national strategy for chronic pain in Canada successfully brought together a stellar program of leading edge speakers and stimulated rich discussion. 2018 Program; Forum 2018 Proceedings Report  

Keynote presentations from Maria Hudspith, Executive Director at Pain BC, a member of the Canadian Pain Care Forum, and Dr. Linda L. Porter, Director of the Office of Pain Policy at the National Institute of Health, brought national and international perspectives that set the stage for important conversations that followed.  Panel chairs and speakers comprised a carefully selected group of national thought leaders with specific expertise from all sectors of the health sciences.  Collectively, they effectively articulated the magnitude of the problem and questions posed led to rich discussion and generated ideas complimentary to work being done in the US.

An important activity at our annual event is the formal Induction of new Fellows into the Academy.  We welcomed 44 New Fellows this year.  Of these, 35 joined us in Vancouver and participated in the ceremony.  It was a wonderful evening that brought together friends new and old.  It was humbling too to hear of the extraordinary achievements of this cadre of individuals! Congratulations & Welcome to our 2018 Fellows!

Thursday evening was also a time to honour Dr. Dorothy Pringle who was inducted into the select group of Distinguished Fellows – the Academy’s highest award.  Dorothy shared interesting and often amusing personal recollections on the development of Nursing PhD programs and Nurse Practitioner programs in Canada.

Our Friday morning Lecture series honoured two exemplary Fellows, Drs. B. Brett Finlay and Catharine I Whiteside, who gave thought provoking talks.  B. Brett Finlay OC, OBC, FRSC, FCAHS, recipient of the 2018 CAHS Scientific Lecture, gave a stimulating and thought provoking address entitled Let Them Eat Dirt: Raising Your Kids With Their Microbes and Catharine Whiteside CM, MD, PhD, FRCP(C),  FCAHS spoke to Value in Healthcare – Achieving Patient-Centered Impact as this year’s recipient of the Paul Armstrong Lecture.

We were honoured to once again host a joint presentation of the CAHS Cy Frank Lecture and the University of Calgary Cy Frank Legacy Lectureship commemorating our esteemed colleague who contributed so much to the Academy and to health science in Canada. Professor Dame Sally Davies DBE, FRS, FMedSci, recipient of both awards, spoke to Compression of Morbidity: The Role of Big Data. Are there lessons for Canada? Not available for dissemination.

FORUM PRESENTATIONS

INTRODUCTION: FROM PATIENT TO NATIONAL STRATEGY
Keynote Address  Patient perspective
COLLECTIVE ACTION TO TRANSFORM HOW PAIN IS UNDERSTOOD AND TREATED IN BC: A BLUEPRINT FOR A NATIONAL STRATEGY Maria Hudspith Executive Director, Pain BC, Member, Canadian Pain Care Forum
Keynote Address  International perspective
THE US NATIONAL PAIN STRATEGY & NIH FEDERAL PAIN RESEARCH STRATEGY Linda L. Porter PhD Director, Office of Pain Policy, NIH

IS CHRONIC PAIN A BONAFIDE DISEASE?
The Neurobiology Gerald W. Zamponi* PHD, FCAHS, FRSC. CRC in Molecular Neuroscience, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary
The role of endogenous modulation in personalized pain treatment  Serge Marchand PHD  Scientific Director, Fonds de Recherche Quebec, Sante
The Life History Fiona Campbell MD, FRCA  SickKids & President, Canadian Pain Society

THE COMPLEX CHRONIC PAIN ECOSYSTEM; FROM COMORBIDITIES TO DRUG THERAPEUTICS
The Complex Chronic Pain Ecosystem Gilles Lavigne* DMD, PHD, FCAHS  CRC in Pain, Sleep & Head Injury; Sacre-Coeur Hospital, University of Montreal
Challenges In Drug Discovery Terrence P. Snutch* PHD, FCAHS, FRSC  CRC in Biotechnology & Genomics-Neurobiology, University of British Columbia
The National Opioid and Medical Cannabis Context  Samuel Weiss*, PhD, FCAHS, FRSC  Scientific Director, INMHA, University of Calgary

PATHS TO SOLUTIONS I: NON-PHARMACOLOGICAL APPROACHES
Cognitive Therapy Gordon J.G. Asmundson PhD, FRSC University of Regina
Is Pain The Right Target? Michael Sullivan PhD  McGill University  
Moving Into The Digital Age  Patrick J. McGrath* PhD, OC, FCAHS, FRSC Dalhousie University

PATHS TO SOLUTIONS II: SOCIETAL APPROACHES
Can we use the Evidence, Please?  Bonnie Stevens* PhD, FCAHS  Sickkids; Director, University of Toronto Centre for Research on Pain
Co-producing with patients & their families to move the agenda forward Kathryn Birnie PhD CPsych, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto & Child Health Evaluative Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children  Patient Partner: Carley Ouellette RN, BScN, MSc(c), Faculty of Nursing, McMaster University
How do we Get to a National Strategy?  Norman Buckley BA (Psych), MD, FRCPC  McMaster University; Director, Michael G. DeGroote National Pain Centre

2017 Strategies to control the Antimicrobial Resistance Tsunami: Is Canada doing its part?
Co-chaired by CAHS Fellows Drs. John Conly & John Prescott, our 2017 Forum didn’t disappoint.  Strategies to control the antimicrobial resistance tsunami: Is Canada doing its part? successfully brought together a stellar program of leading edge speakers and stimulated rich debate. CAHS 2017 Forum ProgramSummary Report Arising from 2017 AMR Forum

The Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) has been asked by the Minister of Science, on behalf of the Public Health Agency of Canada, with support from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, to examine the current state of knowledge on the socio-economic impact of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) on Canadians and the Canadian health care system. The CAHS is a close collaborator in this assessment and Forum discussion was shaped to explicitly consider the AMR assessment project so as to advise and inform Panel deliberations.

Keynote presentations from Dr. Marc Sprenger, Director of the Antimicrobial Resistance Secretariat at the World Health Organization, and Dr. Siddika Mithani, President of the Public Health Agency of Canada, brought international and national perspectives that set the stage for important conversations that followed.  Panel chairs and speakers comprised a carefully selected group of national thought leaders with specific expertise in antimicrobial resistance from all sectors of the health sciences.  Collectively, they effectively articulated the magnitude of the problem and the pros and cons of solutions proposed world-wide.

An important activity at our annual event is the formal Induction of new Fellows into the Academy.  We welcomed 52 New Fellows this year.  Of these, 42 joined us in Ottawa and participated in the ceremony.  It was a wonderful evening that brought together friends new and old.  It was humbling too to hear of the extraordinary achievements of this cadre of individuals! 2017 New Fellows

Thursday evening was a time to honour two exceptional Fellows.  Dr. Henry G. Friesen was inducted as one of our select group of Distinguished Fellows – the Academy’s highest award – and in return he shared with us fascinating reflections and personal recollections of how research funding has evolved in Canada. Dr. John A. Cairns was also recognized for his contributions to the Academy.  As he completed six years of superb leadership as President-elect, President, and Past-President the Academy reflected also on his past contributions as Chair of both the Fellowship Committee and the Standing Committee on Assessments.  No one could have served so diligently and effectively as John has done in his many roles over the years.  The detailed and thoughtful documentation he has provided for each portfolio touched is of enormous value to the Academy in general but priceless for those stepping into those roles.  John, has contributed significantly to the development and strength of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences and we are profoundly grateful.

The Friday morning Lecture series honoured three exemplary Fellows who gave thought provoking talks based on up-to-the-minute science.

Martin T Schechter  OBC, MD, PhD, FRSC, FCAHS, recipient of the 2017 CAHS Scientific Lecture, gave a stimulating and thought provoking address entitled Heroin on Trial: Rethinking the treatment of opioid addiction.  We were honoured once again to host a joint presentation of the CAHS Cy Frank Lecture and the University of Calgary Cy Frank Legacy Lectureship commemorating our esteemed colleague who contributed so much to the Academy and to health science in Canada. Thomas William Noseworthy CM, MD, FRCPC, FACP, recipient of both awards, spoke to Innovation in healthcare: lines of sight to policy and practice.  Last but not least, Jean Gray  CM, MD, FCAHS presented the Paul Armstrong Lecture and spoke to the Promise and perils of contemporary therapeutics.

Dr. Paul Allison was appointed President Elect at the Annual General Meeting.  The choice of President-elect is of critical importance to our Academy. This individual makes a six year commitment to serve the Academy with two years as President-elect, two years as President and two years as past-President. These are all very much active roles. As well as being a member of the CAHS Board and Board Executive, the President-elect has a variety of assigned duties and the role of President carries substantial responsibilities as the overall leader of the Academy.

Finally, the Office of President was successfully transferred from Dr. Carol Herbert to Dr. Linda Rabeneck. Linda was voted President Elect in 2015 and is now the 7th President to serve the Academy. Working closely with Eleanor Fast, CAHS Executive Director, Linda will apply a laser beam focus to successfully build government relations and achieve financial stability over the next two years. Having completed hugely successfully terms as both President-Elect and President, we very much look forward to Carol applying her boundless energies to the role of Past-President.

FORUM PRESENTATIONS

Keynote Address  International perspective
THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION GLOBAL ACTION PLAN ON ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE
Marc Sprenger Director, Antimicrobial Resistance Secretariat, World Health Organization
Sprenger Keynote

Keynote Address  National perspective
THE PAN-CANADIAN FRAMEWORK ON ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE
Siddika Mithani President, Public Health Agency of Canada
Mithani President’s Keynote address.pdf

Pro Con Debate
A ONE HEALTH STRATEGY IS THE BEST APPROACH TO SEEK SOLUTIONS TO ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE AS A PUBLIC HEALTH CRISIS
PRO  Herman Barkema*, University of Calgary; Thomas Marrie*, Dalhousie University
CON  Lindsay Nicolle*, University of Manitoba; Carlton Gyles*, University of Guelph
Panel 1 One Health Strategy Barkema Marrie Nicolle Gyles

Plenary
WHAT IS HAPPENING WITH SURVEILLANCE OF ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANT ORGANISM THREATS IN CANADA?Are we effectively detecting and monitoring trends and threats in order to inform strategies to reduce the risks and impacts of antimicrobial resistance? What are the major gaps?
Michael Mulvey AMR Surveillance in Humans in Canada, National Microbiology Laboratory & University of Manitoba
Rebecca  Irwin PHAC Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance
Ed Topp  Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Panel 2 Surveillance Mulvey Irwin Topp

Point to Counterpoint
DO WE HAVE EFFECTIVE STEWARDSHIP IN THE HUMAN AND VETERINARY SECTORS IN CANADA?
Are we conserving the effectiveness of existing treatments through infection prevention and control guidelines and practices, education and awareness, regulations, and oversight?  Will removing antimicrobial growth promoters and making all antimicrobials use in feed animals veterinary prescription only reduce resistance? What else is needed, and can agriculture and veterinary medicine rise to the challenge?
POINT
David Patrick UBC School of Public and Population Health
Scott  McEwen Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada & University of Guelph
COUNTERPOINT
Alison  McGeer University of Toronto Dalla Lana School of Public Health 
John  Prescott* University of Guelph
Panel 3 Stewardship Patrick McEwen McGeer Prescott

Point to Counterpoint
WHAT CAN WE DO TO CREATE MORE INNOVATIVE NEW SOLUTIONS TO COUNTERACT LOSS IN ANTIMICROBIAL EFFECTIVENESS THROUGH RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, NEW DIAGNOSTICS AND FINDING NEW ANTIBIOTICS?  HOW MIGHT WE HARNESS THE MICROBIOME?
POINT
Innovations R & D: Marc Ouellette*, Université Laval
Innovations in New Diagnostics. Jo-Anne Dillon*, University of Saskatchewan
Innovations in New Antibiotics: Gerry Wright, McMaster University
COUNTERPOINT
What Innovations R & D & Diagnostics? Robert Hancock*, University of British Columbia
Probiotics and Other Beneficial Microbes: Thomas Louie, University of Calgary
Panel 4 Solutions Ouellette Dillon Wright Hancock Louie

2016 Solutions to inequities in Indigenous health: What works and why?
Co-chaired by CAHS Fellows Drs. Jeffrey Reading and John O’Neil, our 2016 Forum didn’t disappoint.  Solutions to Inequities in Indigenous Health: What Works and Why? successfully brought together a stellar program of informed and leading edge speakers. cahs-2016-forum-program     2016 Forum_Summary Paper Major Forum

The event opened with a traditional greeting from Mrs. Amelia Tekwatonti McGregor, representing the Bear Clan of Kahnawake Mohawk Territory. Then Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith, a Maori expert in health services from the University of Waikato, and Professor Malcolm King of Simon Fraser University, and Scientific Director of the CIHR Institute of Aboriginal People’s Health,  brought national and international perspectives to Indigenous health and social conditions. Each discussed challenges they believe lie ahead with respect to improving the health and well-being of Indigenous Peoples’ health in Canada.

Panel chairs and speakers addressed a broad spectrum of innovation including biological and epigenetic issues, self-governance, health services policy and governance showcasing novel researchers and thought leaders who have successfully engaged with their community partners.

Meaningful conversations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous participants will contribute to the process of determining a meaningful and important assessment question.  It will be essential that any assessment question be determined with Indigenous partners. Closing remarks from Margo Greenwood summarized the most important messages and reminded the audience of highlights of the day.

An important activity at our annual event is the formal Induction of new Fellows into the Academy.  We welcomed 36 new Fellows this year.  Of these, 32 joined us in Montreal and participated in the ceremony.  It was a wonderful evening that brought together friends new and old.  It was humbling too to hear of the extraordinary achievements of this cadre of individuals!  2016-new-fellows

Dr. Jean Rochon was also inducted as a Distinguished Fellow; the Academy’s highest award.  He shared fascinating insights and wisdom gleaned from a life lived at the interface of science and policy.

Of course, the event didn’t conclude with the evening’s program and on Friday morning we received three thoughtful presentations on important topics from recipients of CAHS Lectureship awards.

Jocelyn Downie, recipient of the 2016 CAHS Scientific Lecture, gave a stimulating and thought provoking address on assisted dying in Canada.

Eldon R. Smith, recipient of the 2016 Paul Armstrong Lecture, shared his reflections on the Academy and the health care system.

We were  particularly honoured this year to host a joint inaugural presentation of the CAHS Cy Frank Lecture and the University of Calgary Cy Frank Legacy Lectureship commemorating our esteemed colleague who contributed so much to the Academy and to health science in Canada. Alan Bernstein, recipient of both awards, revisited the promise of the health sciences in the 21st Century.

FORUM PRESENTATIONS

Welcome and greetings from Carol Herbert*, President, Canadian Academy of Health Sciences and Alain Beaudet*, President, Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Keynote Addresses

Contextualizing the conversation: Why are we where we are in terms of indigenous health in Canada? Malcolm King, Scientific Director, CIHR Institute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health

Health Solutions – What is going on elsewhere? Linda Tuhiwai Smith, University of Waikato, New Zealand

Panel 1

Reconciliation and Relationships: Framing the Issues  Introduction & Panel Chair: John O’Neil*, Simon Fraser University

truth-and-reconciliation-commission, Jeffrey Reading*, Simon Fraser University

british-columbia-first-nations-health-authority Joseph Gallagher, Chief Executive Officer, FNHA

ethical-issues Marlene Brant Castellano, Trent University

Panel Discussion

Panel 2

Health Solutions for the Future: Promising Practices  Introduction & Panel Chair:  Stewart Harris*, Western University

respectful-genetics-research-with-indigenous-communities Robert Hegele*, Western University

hiv-aids-and-aboriginal-women Charlotte Loppie, University of Victoria

mental-health Laurence J. Kirmayer*, McGill University

Panel Discussion

Panel 2b 

Health Solutions for the Future: Promising Practices Introduction & Panel Chair:   Laurence J. Kirmayer*, McGill University

comparison-funding-arrangements-in-health-care-delivery Josee Lavoie, University of Manitoba

diabetes_kahnawake-experience Ann Macaulay, McGill University & Alex McComber, Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Project

environmental-change_northern-inuit-perspectives Pierre Ayotte, Université Laval

Panel Discussion


Closing Address: Margo Greenwood

2015 The Dementia Challenge: Facing the Rising Tide by 2025
This year’s event, held in Ottawa on September 17 and 18, 2015, featured a dynamic Forum entitled The Rising Tide of Dementia in Canada: Facing the Critical Challenge by 2025. Canada faces an unprecedented population shift towards those over age 65, projected to bring a rising tide of dementia that will reshape our landscape, socially, economically, medically and politically. It will tax our delivery of care, our environment and the sustainability of our current health care system. Program; Dementia Forum 2015_CAHS Short Paper

Carole Estabrooks and Howard Feldman, Forum Co-Chairs, are congratulated on a superbly planned and executed program. Presentations were interesting and informative, and generated many questions from the Fellows in attendance. There was lively exchange throughout the day.

Professor Sube Banerjee, of the Brighton and Sussex Medical School in the United Kingdom and Professor Miia Kivipelto of the Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden, shared global insights in their keynote address and discussed the latest evidence on the impact of dementia and preventive strategies. They gave a joint post-event interview with Jocelyne Feine, CAHS Fellow, which will be posted to the home page of the website shortly. We also heard from a wealth of Canadian experts from academe (including CAHS Fellows) who outlined what they have done and what they believe should be done to accelerate a Dementia strategy for Canada. A proceedings report will be available shortly that will inform the development of an assessment question.

Speaker presentations
The Dementia Challenge: Yves Joanette

A current global perspective on the epidemiology and nature of the dementias, their global impact, pressing challenges and what it would mean if dementia were a major public health priority

Sube Banerjee

The real potential to prevent Alzheimer’s Disease. Miia Kivipelto

Panel 1: State of biological and epidemiological science.
Canada’s position in the global scientific effort to prevent, slow and treat dementia. Howard Chertkow


What are the critical scientific challenges in the effort to prevent, slow and treat dementia. Howard Feldman

Panel 2a: Milder Stages of Dementia: The community and systems of care
Home/community care intersection of formal & informal care. Anne Martin-Matthews

The Saskatchewan approach to rural and remote dementia care Andrew Kirk

Integrated systems of Care Howard Bergman

Panel 2b: Later Stages of Dementia: Changing needs and resources.
End of life care in acute and continuing care settings Kelli Stajduhar

Quality of care and life – residential settings Carole Estabrooks

The Formal Care Workforce – challenges Tamara Daly

The Capacity and Costs of Dementia Care for the Informal Workforce Janet Fast

Panel 3: Meeting the Challenge – The potential of solutions
Dementia Friendly Communities (actual programs) Verena Menec
Disruption Ahead: Transforming Technology to Support Older Adults with Dementia Alex Mihailidis

International Innovation – Re-imagining long-term residential Care: Perspectives on promising practices Pat Armstrong

Dementia – Friendly Care Settings – Understanding the Person-Environment Fit in Dementia Care Janice Keefe

This year we celebrated the 10th Anniversary of the founding of the CAHS! The occasion was appropriately marked with specially invited feature lectures from Paul Armstrong, Graham Bell and Victor Dzau with the rather provocative heading Learned Societies – A Real Value or A Pastime for Aging Academics?

The 10-year history of the Academy was carefully recorded too, a task admirably undertaken by John Cairns and Paul Armstrong. The resulting publication entitled From concept to impact – 10 years of progress was launched at the event.

David Naylor of the University of Toronto was honoured with the Paul Armstrong Lectureship in recognition of his leadership & commitment to advance academic health sciences through academic service and innovation at local, national and international levels and achievements that are truly extraordinary. David’s talk entitled How Canada’s healthcare systems can regain lost ground promoted key features of the recent report of the Advisory Panel on Healthcare Innovation entitled Unleashing Innovation: Excellent Healthcare for Canada.

35 new Fellows were inducted into the Academy in 2015. The distinctive competencies of these distinguished individuals have led to accomplishments and academic service to the full breadth of academic health sciences that is truly remarkable. The Induction Ceremony, led this year by Linda Rabeneck and Louise Potvin, celebrated their remarkable personal contributions.  2015 CAHS Elected Fellows

2014 The Commercialization of Health Research for Health, Social and Economic Benefit: Towards an Evidence-Informed Approach

2014 Forum and Annual General Meeting

Held in Ottawa on September 18 and 19, 2014, the event featured a dynamic Forum entitled Commercialization of Health Research for Health, Social and Economic Benefit: Towards an Evidence-Informed Approach. Rick Riopelle of McGill University and Cy Frank of University of Calgary co-chaired the outstanding planning committee who put together this exciting and stimulating program.   Peter Nicholson, who edited the recent Council of Canadian Academies publication “Paradox Lost”, shared his global insights in the keynote address and we also heard from a variety of Canadian experts from academe (including CAHS Fellows), government and industry who outlined what they have done and what they believe should be done to accelerate Canada’s progress, with evidence, in the commercialization of health research. The power of the collective approach towards impact was most certainly on display through the highly informed interactions sequenced across plenaries, moderated discussions, breakout sessions and session reporting that culminated in an excellent summary statement from Cy Frank. Comments received from Forum participants are testimony to the wisdom of Academy directions towards fulsome Fellow engagement that all in attendance were witness to throughout the day.  HIGHLIGHTS OF THE 2014 CAHS FORUM

Special features of the 2014 event included an address from Professor Lap-Chee Tsui, President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Hong Kong and recipient of the2014 Henry G Friesen International Prize in Health Research.   Jane Green of Memorial University shared insights gained from her study of hereditary cancers and eye diseases in Newfoundland and Bartha Knoppers of McGill University talked about a global alliance for genetics and health.   Peter Singer of the University of Toronto was honoured with the Paul Armstrong Lectureship in recognition of his leadership & commitment to advance academic health sciences through academic service and innovation at local, national and international levels and achievements that are truly extraordinary.

Forum Presentations

Keynote Address: The Paradox Lost Challenge Peter Nicholson Panel 1 -Implications of commercialization for academics, funders and health research organizations in Canada Chair: Angus Livingstone

  1. Creating the Winning Conditions: A HealthCareCAN Perspective: Bill Tholl
  2. A Survey: Organization State of Readiness for Innovation: Gabriela Prada
  3. Implications for Career Development: Matthew Herder

Panel 2 – Lessons Learned from Current and Past Experience in Canada Chair: Roger Pierson Commercialization Support Programs

  1. Medteq: Diane Cote
  2. IRAP; Roman Szumski
  3. Mitacs: Rebecca Reich

Academia-Business Examples: Positive and Negative Lessons Learned

  1. Chris McMaster
  2. Michel Bergeron
  3. Patrick McGrath

Panel 3Future Directions for Canada Chair: Diane Finegood

  1. Personalized Medicine – Canada PRO: Sara Ahmed and Susan Bartlett
  2. Measuring Returns on Investment for Impact: Kathryn Graham

THE ARMSTRONG LECTURE

Grand Challenges:  Lessons Learned in Innovation & Development  PETER A. SINGER OC, MD, MPH

SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATIONS

Genetics Research in Newfoundland and Labrador: Lessons from the Past Contribute to New Science Now, and Improved Health Outcomes for the Future Jane Green BSC, MSC (UBC), PHD (MEMORIAL), ONL. Whither the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health? Bartha Maria Knoppers, Ph.D, O.C., O.Q.

2013 Substance Use and Addiction

2013 Forum and Annual General Meeting 

Substance use and addiction have a tremendous impact on individuals and communities in our country and have been estimated to cost Canada around $40 billion per year.  There is a growing body of science regarding solutions to this challenge, but this is a complex societal issue where moral and emotional perspectives introduce a critical overlay to the available evidence. This is precisely the kind of challenge that the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences is meant to confront and accordingly, our annual Forum on September 19th, 2013 addressed the full spectrum of these issues. CAHS Program_Forum and AGM_September 2013

A lively scholarly debate on the resolution of whether or not the use of illicit substances should be legalized brought to a close an outstanding symposium focused on multi-disciplinary biologic approaches to understanding addiction, societal and environmental determinants of substance abuse, and innovations in our approach to addiction. Recordings of the Forum are linked below. We are most grateful to Michel Boivin, Laval University; John Cairns*, University of British Columbia; Columbia; Cam Wild, University of Alberta; Chief Wayne Christian, Shuswap Nation Tribal Council; Patricia Conrod, Université de Montréal; Prabhat Jha, University of Toronto; Sherry Stewart*, Dalhousie University; Marco Leyton, McGill University; Art Petronis, University of Toronto; Anthony Phillips*, University of British Columbia; and Franco Vaccarino, University of Toronto for their excellent presentations.  Debate:  For, Ethan Nadelmann, US Drug Policy Alliance; Against, Michel Perron, Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse; For – Rebuttal, Senator Larry Campbell, Senate Standing Committees on Aboriginal Peoples and Internal Economy, Budgets and Administration; Against – Rebuttal, Peter Butt, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan. Panel Chair -Martin Schechter*, University of British Columbia.  * Fellow, Canadian Academy of Health Sciences

SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINANTS OF SUBSTANCE USE Early Childhood Experience, Michel Boivin, Laval University; Legacy of Residential Schooling, Chief Wayne Christian; Shuswap Nation Tribal Council; Impact of Substance Use on Global Health; Prabhat Jha*, University of Toronto BIOLOGIC APPROACHES TO UNDERSTANDING ADDICTION Epigenetics, Art Petronis  University of Toronto; What does neuroimaging tell us?, Marco Leyton, McGill University; Insights into the neural bases of addiction, Anthony Phillips*, University of British Columbia INNOVATIONS IN OUR APPROACH TO ADDICTION The Science of Harm Reduction, Cam Wild, University of Alberta;   Innovations in therapy, Franco Vaccarino, University of Toronto;  Targeted Interventions for Youth, Patricia Conrod, Université de Montréal Slide Presentations: Michel Boivin_CAHS Forum 2013 Chief Wayne Christian_CAHS Forum 2013 Patricia Conrod_CAHS Forum 2013 Prabhat Jha_CAHS Forum 2013 Marco Leyton_CAHS Forum 2013 Art Petronis-CAHS Forum 2013 Anthony Phillips_CAHS Forum 2013 Franco Vaccarino_CAHS Forum 2013 Cam Wild_CAHS Forum 2013

DEBATE: BE IT RESOLVED THAT USE OF ILLICIT DRUGS SHOULD BE DECRIMINALIZED   For, Ethan Nadelmann, US Drug Policy Alliance; Against, Michel Perron, Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse; For – Rebuttal, Senator Larry Campbell, Senate Standing Committees on Aboriginal Peoples and Internal Economy, Budgets and Administration ; Against – Rebuttal, Peter Butt, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan Professor Harvey V. Fineberg, 2013 Recipient of the Henry G Friesen International Prize in Health Research, gave an insightful luncheon address on “America’s Ambivalence about the Right to Health Care”.  The Paul Armstrong Lecture – recognizing leadership & commitment to advance academic health sciences through academic service and innovation at local, national and international levels and achievements that are truly extraordinary – was presented this year by Lorne Tyrrell who spoke to A life in discovery, translation, and commercialization of research focused on viral hepatitis.  Invited Scientific Presentations recognize and showcase exemplary research of our Fellows. This year’s presenters – Neil Cashman who spoke to Prions and prion-like diseases: Twisted sisters and Joy Johnson who spoke to Why Gender Matters to Public Health: A Tale of Three Studies – demonstrated best in class research; a hallmark of our Fellows.  Dr. David Sackett, a pioneer in the field of clinical epidemiology in Canada, was inducted as the 2013 Distinguished Fellow.

54 New Fellows Inducted to the Academy in 2013 The distinctive competencies of these distinguished individuals have led to accomplishments and academic service to the full breadth of academic health sciences that is truly remarkable.  TheInduction Ceremony, led this year by Jocelyne Feine and Louise Potvin, celebrated their remarkable personal contributions.

2012 End of Life Care in Canada: The Last 100 Days

September 20 and 21, 2012, Forum and Annual General Meeting

End of Life Care in Canada: The Last 100 Days marked the Academy’s 7th Annual Forum and Annual General Meeting at the Ottawa Fairmont Chateau Laurier. Dr. Deborah Cook and her planning team are congratulated on creating a program that stimulated what many considered to be our most exciting dialogue to date.  The Academy, while striving to increase Fellow engagement in meaningful ways, specifically designed the program to emphasize audience interaction and did so very successfully.  CAHS Forum Program_September 2012 How much have you thought about this universal human experience: the end of life? Whereas most of us have some personal experiences with this subject, care at the end of life care is not a private matter nor necessarily remote.  End of life care is delivered daily from coast to coast in our universal health care system, largely in a contemporary technologically-advanced hospital.  With a grounding plenary lecture, several mini-symposia and panel discussions reflecting national and international evidence on this topic, the program provided a state-of-the-art and state-of-the-science review of end of life care, sharing both present realities and emerging research.  This environmental scan of end of life care has implications for many stakeholders: patients, families, clinicians, policy-makers and all citizens.  Dialogue served to highlight current controversies, underscore unmet needs, and forge future directions to improve end of life care for all Canadians. The keynote address, from Daren Heyland, was followed by presentations from Drs. Paul Armstrong, Kerry Bowman, John Cairns, Deborah Cook, Sharon Carstairs, Sara Davison, Jocelyn Downie, Robert Fowler, Jonathan Howlett, David Kuhl, Andreas Laupacis,Graeme Rocker, Peter Singer, and Kelli Stajduhar.  The event closed with remarks from our President, Tom Marrie. The following articles have been published in a special series by Clinical Investigative Medicine: End of Life Care in Canada A Report from the CAHS Forum Deborah Cook, MD, MSc(Epid), FRCPC & Graeme Rocker, MHSc, DM, FRCP, FRCPC  Clin Inv­est Med 2013; 36 (3): E112-E113 INSPIRED Approaches to Better Care for Patients with Advanced COPD Graeme M Rocker, MHSc, DM, FRCP, FRCPC & Deborah Cook, MD, MSc(Epid), FRCPC  Clin Inv­est Med 2013; 36 (3): E114-E120 Burdens of Family Caregiving at the End of Life  Kelli I. Stajduhar, RN, PhD  Clin Invest Med 2013; 36 (3): E121-E126 End-of-Life Care in Canada  Robert Fowler, MDCM, MS, FRCPC & Michael Hammer, BSc Clin Inv­est Med 2013; 36 (3): E127-E132 The Inaugural Paul Armstrong Lecture In an expression of gratitude for Paul Armstrong’s vision and wisdom that continues to benefit and steer the Academy, we are delighted to launch this special Lectureship. Paul’s leadership and commitment to advance academic health sciences through academic service and innovation at local, national and international levels has led to achievements that are truly extraordinary.  This year’s recipient, Jean Rouleau, spoke to “How best to bring clinical, health systems and population health research forward in Canada over the next 10 years”. Henry G Friesen International Prize in Health Research Professor Marc Tessier-Lavigne, 2012 Recipient of the Henry G Friesen International Prize in Health Research, gave a luncheon address on “Brain development and brain degeneration: molecular control of nerve growth and pruning”. Invited Scientific Presentations by CAHS Fellows A new element introduced to the program this year was the opportunity to showcase the research of some of our Fellows.  These three quite varied but equally fascinating presentations included The Future is Aging: Canadian research priorities in global context by Anne Martin Matthews; Knowledge Translation – Where do we go from here? by Ian Graham; and Badgers, Cattle and People: The epidemiologic triad of bovine tuberculosis in Ireland by Wayne Martin.

53 New Fellows Inducted to the Academy in 2012 The distinctive competencies of these distinguished individuals have led to accomplishments and academic service to the full breadth of academic health sciences that is truly remarkable.  The Induction Ceremony, led by Drs. Paul Armstrong and Jocelyne Feine, included many family members this year adding to the warmth of our celebrations.

2011 Smarter Caring for a Healthier Canada: Embracing System Innovation

September 15 & 16, 2011

The 6th Annual CAHS Forum and Annual General Meeting was held at the Chateau Laurier Hotel in Ottawa on September 15 & 16, 2011. On the first day, a provocative and stimulating full day symposium was held entitled “Smarter Caring for a Healthier Canada: Embracing System Innovation” led by Brian R. Golden, the Sandra Rotman Chaired Professor in Health Sector Strategy at the Rotman School of Management, The University of Toronto, and The University Health Network. An audience of 150 CAHS Fellows and invited guests interacted with panelists and speakers in this solutions-focused event that highlighted innovations that can truly change how the system operates and how care is experienced by Canadians. Adapting the model of the Citizens’ Jury process, the event included a Community panel charged with responding to what they had heard about disruptive innovation, equity, efficiency and sustainability and how they saw the ideas and examples impacting on citizens who receive care from the health care system. CAHS Annual Meeting 2011_Forum Summary Presenters this year included – Keynote: Brian R. Golden. Equity: Nancy Edwards (presenter and panel chair)*; Margo Greenwood; Louise Nasmith*. Efficiency: Jack Kitts; Patricia Kosseim; Robyn Tamblyn*; panel chair – Bartha Knoppers*. Sustainability: Don Drummond; Jeremiah Hurley; Kevin McNamara panel chair – Pierre-Gerlier Forest*. Citizen’s Jury: Cindy Blackstock; Sharon Sholzberg-Gray; Anne Snowdon; panel chair – André Picard.

*=CAHS Fellows Slide Presentations: Edwards_approvedGolden_approved; Greenwood_approved; Hurley_approved; Kitts_approved; Kosseim_approved; McNamara_approvedNasmith_approved; Tamblyn_approved; Turnbull_approved In the evening, 45 new Fellows (see below) were inducted into the Academy together with the fifth Distinguished Fellow, Mr. Stephen Lewis. Although unable to attend in person, Mr. Lewis joined us via video address and spoke passionately on the subject – “The Battle Against AIDS Can Be Won, But It Won’t Be Won: Why Not?” The session ended on September 16th as Fellows attended the annual business meeting, listened to updates about ongoing assessments, potential future assessments and participated in lively discussion around impact and the effective dissemination of our work. The 2011 Distinguished Fellow – Mr. Stephen Lewis An outstanding international champion for social justice and improved health of populations in developing nations across the globe whose achievements are truly extraordinary.

2010 Personalized Health Care – Epigenetics, Ethics, Education, Economics

The 2010 CAHS Annual Meeting was held at the Westin Hotel in Ottawa on September 30 – October 1, 2010. Slide presentations are provided below. Keynote Tom Hudson; Epigenetics Arrowsmith; Epigenetics Kobor; Ethics Caulfield; Ethics Daar; Education Ensom; Education Thorne; Economics Peacock We concluded a highly successful Forum and annual general meeting in Ottawa on September 30 and October 1, 2010. On the first day, a provocative and stimulating full day symposium was held entitled “Personalized Health Care – Epigenetics, Ethics, Education, Economics”, led by Tom Hudson, President and Scientific Director, The Ontario Institute for Cancer Research. More than 100 Fellows and guests interacted with panelists and speakers including – Cheryl H. Arrowsmith, Ontario Cancer Institute, University of Toronto; Morris L. Barer, Director, UBC Centre for Health Services and Policy Research; Timothy Caulfield, Research Director, Health Law Institute, University of Alberta; Abdallah Daar, Professor of Public Health Sciences and of Surgery and Director of Ethics and Commercialization at the McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health, University Health Network and University of Toronto; Mary Ensom, Director, Doctor of Pharmacy Program, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia; Robert G. Evans, Department of Economics and Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, University of British Columbia; Thomas Feasby University of Calgary; Jean Gray, Dalhousie University; Jeremy Grimshaw, Director, Centre for Best Practices, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa; Bartha Knoppers, Chair, Public Population Project in Genomics(P3G), McGill University; Michael Kobor, Centre for Molecular Medicine and Theapeutics, University of British Columbia; Roderick McInnes, Scientific Director, Lady Davis Institute, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University; Anita E. Molzahn, Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta; Stuart Peacock, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia and BC Cancer Agency; Sally Thorne, Director, UBC School of Nursing; Gustavo Turecki, MD, PhD, Douglas McGill Director of McGill Studies on Suicide. Participants were treated to a thought-provoking luncheon talk from Shirley Tilghman, the 2010 Friesen Prize winner, on the subject of Educating for the Future of Biomedical Science.  The event, sponsored by the Council of Canadian Academies, was attended by The Honorable David C. Jacobson, the United States Ambassador to Canada. In the evening, 37 new Fellows (see below) were inducted into the Academy together with the fourth Distinguished Fellow, Dr. Calvin R. Stiller. Dr. Stiller participated in the ceremony welcoming the new Fellows and provided some entertaining remarks about his remarkable career and his thoughts on the remarkable work being achieved and the critical need for investment in health sciences research in Canada. The session ended on October 1st, as Fellows attended the annual business meeting and heard updates about ongoing assessment work and impact and participated in a lively debate on our future strategic directions. 37 New Fellows Inducted At the 2010 Induction Ceremony the following outstanding individuals were welcomed into the Academy. 2010 Distinguished Fellow – Calvin R. Stiller M.D. An outstanding physician, scientist and entrepreneur who has championed innovation in health and biomedical research, and it’s application, for health improvements that are truly extraordinary.

2009 Canada’s Strategic Role in Global Health
2008 Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Canadians;
2008 Health System Transformation to Meet the Burden of Chronic Disease
2007 Return on Investments in Health Research
2006 How can CAHS Achieve its Mission?
2005 The CAHS Assessment Program